blog

space.games.film poster english

Watch space.games.film for free

About two and a half years ago we celebrated the premiere of our first feature length documentary space.games.film during the Gamescom in a cinema in Cologne. The responses to the film were overwhelming. We received a lot of positive and heartwarming feedback, so that, at least for the evening of the premiere, all the troubles during the production process were forgotten. After the screening we talked to the protagonists and the premiere visitors until late into the night and enjoyed a fantastic conclusion to an eventful production.

Unfortunately, the film didn’t sell as expected. The costs for Vimeo, hosting and the domain alone still exceed the revenues considerably. The extremely positive feedback, however, continues to this day, which is a big part of the reason why we are still continuing.

So what now? Well, from now on we are also offering space.games.film for free! Whether for a cautious peek or a legal film experience for free – we are happy when the film is being watched. You have friends who are enthusiastic space sim fans? You know people who are interested in a game documentary? Then help us to make space.games.film better known and tell them about it. Click here to go directly to the film on YouTube.

You can also purchase it at shop.games.film. The retail version can be downloaded and contains no watermark and has a better quality than the one streamed on YouTube. If you like space.games.film and would like to show it to us without straight away buying it, invite us for a drink at the Cantina in the shop and give upcoming projects an extra boost!

Blackbird Interactive Project Lynx

Project Lynx – Deleted scene from space.games.film

For space.games.film we shot many hours of footage, but only a fraction of it made it into the final cut. In the form of Deleted Scenes, we want to show you interesting interview parts and B-roll that didn’t make it into the film.

In the case of Rob Cunningham’s part in the film, this involved a scene in which he talks about a game with the working title “Project Lynx”. When we visited Blackbird Interactive in 2017 they were in the middle of developing the game, in which you disassemble decommissioned spaceships as a space worker to recycle their valuable parts. In terms of subject matter, it fit perfectly into the film. But the announcement date of the game was pushed back too far and the scene didn’t fit into the overall composition of Rob’s part, so we cut it completely.

“Project Lynx” was announced in early 2020 as “Hardspace: Shipbreaker” and released in mid-June 2020 for Early Access. Now that you have a direct comparison, it’s particularly exciting to see what has become of the vision from three years ago.

 

Brian Chambers at Gamescom 2016

Brian Chambers at Gamescom 2016 – Deleted scenes from space.games.film

For space.games.film we shot many hours of footage, but only a fraction of it made it into the final cut. In the form of Deleted Scenes, we want to show you interesting interview parts and B-roll that didn’t make it into the film.

Gamescom 2016 was the start of principal photography for space.games.film. Our plan was to meet most of our protagonists there for the first time and also to do short interviews with them, which we would then use in the intro for the film.

At the booth of Star Citizen we had a meeting with Brian Chambers, then Development Director at Foundry 42 in Frankfurt (today Vice President Of Development). From the first moment on his enthusiasm and his personal way of narrating inspired us, which was also helpful for the direction we wanted to take with the film.

In the end it unfortunately didn’t work out to visit Brian in his studio. We were very interested in his thoughts about space games and surely he would have had one or the other exciting anecdote that would have pushed the film even further. But without an own part in the studio we had no choice but to cut out his interviews at the Gamescoms completely. You can watch the video to tell why we did that only very reluctantly.

 

Gamescom 2016 - Deleted Scenes - space.games.film

Gamescom 2016 – Deleted scenes from space.games.film

For space.games.film we shot many hours of material. The first complete rough cut was correspondingly much longer than the final version is. Some almost finished scenes fell victim to the editing scissors; because they didn’t advance the film, because circumstances had changed or because they just didn’t fit.

In the Gamescom 2016 sequence at the beginning of space.games.film, this was especially the case for Chris Roberts, who passionately talks about his support for other space games. Michael Graf, Michael Schade and Andreas Suika also share their passion and enthusiasm at the exhibition with us.

The personal statements illustrate the people behind the developers (and journalists) and we really would have liked to include them in the film. However, they would have stretched the intro too much and we would have deviated too much from the actual space theme.

In the form of Deleted Scenes, we now want to show you these (and in the next few weeks more) interesting interview parts and B-roll that didn’t make it into the film. Enjoy!

 

noclip video

Documentary series recommendation: noclip

As already announced in the previous blog entry, here comes the second recommendation for documentaries with a focus on games: the YouTube channel of noclip.

In most of their documentaries noclip explore a game dev studio or a specific game and its history. The protagonists tell the history of the studio or the game and how they have experienced it. Accompanied by many vivid game sequences and video clips, the interested viewer gets a lot of information. The sympathetic founder of noclip and former GameSpot presenter Danny O’Dwyer guides through the documentaries.

The emphasis at noclip is more on the “making of” of the games and the history of the studios, while games.film focuses more on the personalities and emotions of the protagonists. At their core, games.film and noclip make passionate documentaries about computer games and their developers. And another important thing we have in common: we love games. 🙂 Have a look, maybe you”ll like the style of noclip even more.

Cloth Map Logo

Documentary series recommendation: Cloth Map

So far we have published one feature length documentary with space.games.film and several short documentaries. Until we are able to shoot again and actually have the means to make another long film, the question for you might be: what other game documentaries are around? Well, I have two recommendations that are very worthwhile. I’ll introduce the first one in this blog entry and the second one in the next.

Travel and gaming are wonderful topics per se, which can be packed together in documentaries. Cloth Map makes exciting travel documentaries with a focus on gaming. These (if you watch the individual videos per country in one go) medium-length documentaries not only deal with computer games, but also with the respective country, its inhabitants and their gaming culture.

For this, filmmaker Drew Scanlon has already been to the Chernobyl exclusion zone in the Ukraine, has given an insight into the underground gaming network in Cuba and visited e-sports players in Mongolia. This playlist offers a good overview of his work. Besides his “core films” there are also a lot of other videos like VLOGs and podcasts.

By the way: if you’re looking for easily digestible magazine reports for quick enjoyment about travel & gaming, you’ll find them in IGN’s Fast Travel series.